Mark Sanford: GOP Can’t Have ‘Selective Outrage’ Over Steve King and Not Trump

‘A lot of other people in Congress have given Trump a complete blank slate, no, we’re not going to comment there’

EXCERPT:

SANFORD: "I think you are asking the $94 question. Because I think what’s happening here goes well beyond Steve King. What it represents is the further devolution of political debate in this country. Tim Scott, senator from here in South Carolina, I think was eloquent in his condemnation of Steve’s remarks. But the bigger question is what Romney raised. Romney said his comments aren’t appropriate for polite company. Are you kidding me? I mean, what’s interesting about that is where is the outrage when Donald Trump says crazy things or racist things? Where is the outrage when Maxine Waters goes and says, 'Let’s go after the kids of cabinet members'' Where is the outrage when a recently elected senator from Mississippi says put me on the front row of the lynching mob. What you can’t have in politics is selective outrage where we say, 'We are outraged at this, but we’ll turn a blind eye to all this other. So what I find a little bit wanting, if you will, is Romney’s comments in light of his quietness with the exception of the recent op-ed on Trump. And a lot of other people in Congress have given Trump a complete blank slate, 'No, we’re not going to comment there.' But we’ll go and censure and take from committee assignments and others Steve King, who made wrong comments, everybody can agree on that, but you can’t have selective outrage, which is what we’ve got in Congress now."

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