Gillum Campaign Attorney: ‘Concessions Don’t Have a Legal Force’

‘They’ve been traditionally a courtesy that on election night the candidate that comes in second will call the other candidate to congratulate him and to concede’

EXCERPT:

HAYES: "Two final questions. One is Andrew Gillum did concede and he noted that in his statement today but says he wants to see every vote counted. That concession, does that have any legal force?"
RICHARD: "No. Concessions don’t have a legal force. They’ve been traditionally a courtesy that on election night the candidate that comes in second will call the other candidate to congratulate him and to concede. If the vote count changes over time, it's not like a contract was signed. And that goes both ways. I think that if it had gone the other way, I would expect Mr. DeSantis would have called Mr. Gillum to congratulate him and to concede, but they’re not legally binding."

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